air bag recall

Managing Vehicle Recalls

There’s a little stack of recall notices on my small desk in the kitchen. At least one for each vehicle each family member owns. Two for the Jeep, three for the Toyota, two for the Dodge and one for the Ford. I’m pretty sure everyone’s airbags are recalled at this point.

It seems hardly a day goes by without the evening news including a vehicle recall notice, most recently that Kia and Hyundai engines can catch on fire.  I wonder, were these defects not noticed years back? Maybe it was harder to find owners to send the notices to if they were, or has the fast-paced world of pumping out the latest and greatest caused quality control to go out the window altogether?  

As it turns out there are two answers, and they both confirm that yes, we are seeing more recalls than decades past. The first reason is that, just like every complex machine we own from washing machines to motorcycles, many of the parts that make up these machines are coming from the same manufacturer. Brands are names and logos with some defining characteristics in what the products looks like on the outside, though under the hood and beyond the dashboard many of the gidgets and gadgets that make the machine run are somewhat standard issue. Take the washing machine for instance; you have a box with a drum inside. You push buttons or turn knobs at the top of the box, put the clothes in the drum, and viola- you’ll soon have clean clothes. Most washing machines spin that drum of dirty jeans into clean pants via a motor, pump, belt, transmission, and a computer board. Back in the day most of these components were made by the manufacturer of the box, the one with the brand and the logo. Today, that motor might be made by company ABC and happens to be the same company that makes the motors in half a dozen washing machine brands. Same story with the rest of the parts that make the drum spin. Vehicle manufacturing is no stranger to this modern mode of mass production.

A great example of this is the Takata Air Bag. Twenty-two separate vehicle manufactures are listed as having Takata air bags, I couldn’t find the list of how many in total have their air bags recalled or not. This is just one example how one part on one make/model could be a small part of a recall on thousands of parts in dozens of makes and models. The air bag recall affected 42 million vehicles made by everyone from Chrysler to Volkswagen.  Which leads us to the second reason we’re getting so many notices of these recalls- it’s too dangerous to not pay attention.

Too many recalls were being discovered after the defect had caused a tragedy. This lead to a demand for more oversight into the safety of our vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration stepped up its efforts to find defects before more people got hurt. Now, it is up to us as car owners to stay on top of getting those recall issues taken care of.  It is also important not to assume that if you haven’t received a notice you don’t have a recall. 

Experts suggest checking your VIN number for possible recalls becomes a maintenance habit. Checking each time you change your oil for example will ensure you are staying on top of things. Heck, since we’re already thinking about it why not check now? Click here to enter the NHTSA recall search site. I need to get off this computer and get those appointments made.

 Blog by: Allison Green

 

Rip-Roaring Fast Cars in 2016!

If rip-roaring fast sports cars make you happy then the following models are for you! 

Hennessey Venom (270 miles per hour)

Do we need to say more?  Yes, so much more, because this is the world's fastest production car on the byways made in America!  Always proud to say those words.  Time that we get back to more of what we love and make it in America.  

Capable of speeds of up to 270 miles per hour, the Venom GT has beat out the Bugatti Veyron to make it the world’s fastest production car. This car practically has wings to fly as it spikes from 0-100 miles per hour in 5.6 seconds due to the power of a 1,244 horsepower 7.0-liter Twin TurbochargedV8 engine.

Manufactured in Texas, the $1.2 million Venom GT is easily the fastest road car to ever come from America. There's so much to love about this beautiful speed demon - check out cheatsheet.com to find out more details about the Venom GT and the 10 other fastest cars made in America! 

This car is simply beautiful!  The 2016 McLaren 675LT boast speed of up to 205 MPH with a mighty V8 engine and a 7 speed SSG Transmission.  A super swift model that definitely has gained attention getting power with less weight and more tail than former models. On the floor of the 2015 Geneva auto show in March 2015, McLaren announced that production of its new 675LT supercar will be strictly limited to 500 units only coupes.  To own this beauty the price tag is top of the line at: $349,500, plus shipping and handling. Like the new color of paint?  “Chicane Gray.”  Click here to learn more about this amazing ride and other cars showcased at the Geneva Auto Show.  

The fascinating and speed driven R8 now hits 62 mph in 3.2 seconds, a half-second faster than before, with a top speed of 205 mph! The Audi R8 will launch in early 2015; it will come to dealers as a 2016 model, at prices ranging from around $120K for a V-8 to over $250K for an R8 e-tron, built by special order only.

 Audi will build all-electric versions on the R8 on special order. The new R8 e-tron is the first car from an established manufacturer to hold more electric power than a Tesla Model S — 92 kWh, which Audi says gives the e-tron a range of 279 miles, and can be recharged in two hours with Audi's high-energy charger. The e-tron is slower than the V-10 — 3.9 seconds to 62 mph, and a top speed limited to 155 mph — and Audi will only build them upon request, at a price that wasn't disclosed...Find out more about the R8V10 here.   Check out the Youtube video of the smokin hot R8 in action!  

As we look forward to a prosperous and promising 2016... we at Richards' Collision Center wish all of you and those you love a very Happy New Year!  

 

Shrapnel Danger - Massive Air Bag Recall Alert!

At Richards' Collision Center we are asked commonly about air bag safety and what is the crash criteria for an air bag to inflate. It is a shared concern among many drivers.  This week NPR.com reports that 10 major auto dealers have announced airbag recalls affecting approximately 8 million vehicles.  An unprecedented recall in the history of vehicle air bags.  So much so that the government is conducting an investigation into the serious issue.   

"Four deaths have been linked to the defect. The problem seems to be triggered by humid conditions. The Department of Transportation has taken the unusual step of urging owners of millions of vehicles who live in areas with high humidity — such as Florida, other Gulf states and Hawaii — to act immediately.  The warning cautions drivers not to use their vehicles until they are serviced by a dealer."  (NPR.com) 

NPR.com states that flying shrapnel from the faulty air bags is the greatest danger.  We urge everyone to go to this site to see if your vehicle is one of the recall models:  safercar.gov.

Read the full article about this important subject that affects millions of drivers at NPR.com and please spread the word to your friends and family.