Flash Floods

June is National Safety Month

As our loved ones file out the door each morning, the one wish we all have for each other is for everyone to safely return home each evening. Having some good sensible knowledge on how to help ensure that wish is granted every day will help put your mind at ease and help your loved ones to be more cognizant of dangers that exist in the world around them. The National Safety Council (NCS) has made June National Safety Month to provide you with everything you need to live as safely as possible.

NCS aims to prevent injuries and accidents with online resources for every potentially dangerous situation from falls to vehicle accidents. Their website provides articles, tips and information that can be downloaded and printed. The NCS encourages participation in National Safety Month in nearly every application. Because every possible safety hazard is addressed within the NCS website the following is a basic breakdown of the most common hazards:

At home: The number one cause of injury or death is poisoning, mainly from prescription drug overdose. This is followed by car accidents, falls, choking, drowning, fires and finally natural or environmental disasters. NCS has tips to prevent each of these tragedies as well as seasonal specific safety tips such as preventing firework injuries and safe bicycling practices during summer months.

At work: The same hazards that exist at home also exist in the workplace, however the likelihood of being injured by machinery or equipment is greatly increased in the workplace. NCS offers training to companies to help their employees prevent injuries from happening as well as first aid and medical response training.

NCS suggest that for both the workplace and in your community, participating in National Safety Month is a good opportunity to host safety presentations, lunch and learns or even have a fun safety trivia game.

On the road: NCS lists alcohol, distracted driving and speeding as the top three causes of vehicle related deaths that claimed over 40,000 lives in 2017.

Defensive driver training and other workplace programs are suggested to not only keep employees safe but everyone else on the road safe as well. With our recent severe flooding and rain it is also imperative that we all make a promise to abide by the well known saying, “Turn Around, Don’t Drown”.

To learn more about what you can do to keep everyone in your life and community safer NCS is offering online webinars during the month of June. Wishing you a SAFE & HAPPY Month!

When Water and Cars Don’t Mix

We see the scene on the news every time heavy rains come. The car, the police, the fireman and the water. Sometimes a flash flood will surprise a fully unexpected driver, though quite often this scene is the result of the driver thinking “I can get through that”. Followed by a call to 911. Our most recent statistics show 64% of flood related deaths happen to people in vehicles. A small car can be carried away by just 12” of moving water, nearly all vehicles can be carried away in 2’ of moving water. That one foot of moving water can create 500 pounds of force. 500 pounds.

Your vehicle might be able to handle or pull that much weight though only when the tires are gripping the ground. Moving water doesn’t allow for any kind of control no matter what type of vehicle you may be driving. Discover what to do if you find yourself caught in a flood event at the American Safety Council site. So, everyone reading this- you’ll never attempt to drive through water right? Great! Moving on to other water woes…

Wet roads

Any amount of rain, especially after a dry spell can create an oily mess on the surface of roads. Experts recommend you don’t use cruise control, reduce your speed and increase traveling distance between other cars to avoid an accident caused by either yourself or someone else hydroplaning. Obviously as in any inclement weather, check tire pressure, wipers and use your headlights.

Car damage

Over one million vehicles were damaged by last years hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Without doing a little homework, one of those vehicles could be your next used car purchase. Flood damaged cars can have electrical damage that may not start creating problems for months as well as trapped mold and mildew and rusting to many of the car’s components.

Understanding rivers

Just because it isn’t raining doesn’t mean your nearby river won’t flood. The Missouri River for example starts in the Rocky Mountains, flows east to North Dakota then south to the Mississippi River. A heavy rainstorm anywhere along that route can increase the rivers levels further down. Tributaries to the Missouri River will drain quickly into the Missouri until the high water pushes flooding back into those smaller rivers and streams. A small stream can easily go from a quaint walk-able waterway to a raging river during flooding, then just as quickly back to the peaceful stream you know and love.  

Other causes of flash flooding

Concrete doesn’t absorb water, so as rain falls on largely developed areas that water keeps moving looking for its eventual path to the ocean. Our States, Counties and Cities do their best to prevent flooding with smart planning and engineering, however mother nature will and does remind us we always have more to learn.

So the next time you clean out the car and come across that little window breaking tool in your drivers side door, remember some common sense can help keep you from ever having to use it. May all your travels be safe and dry!

*If you have flood damage to your vehicle call Richards’ Collision Center for quality, reliable auto body services: 816-767-0707. We work with your insurance company.

Blog by: Allison Green