old cars

Old vs New - The Benefit of Keeping the Car You Have

The battle scars are everywhere which often proves your car is paid in full! I personally prefer to refer to them as car character. There’s a story for each one, such as the green stained dent in the back-left corner of the bumper: that’s the one that reminds me of the time my mother in law borrowed the car and backed it into a giant trash bin. Or the massive dent on the front right bumper, the time my husband’s truck met my car as I was pulling up the driveway and he was backing out. Of course, there are interior marks of character on the inside as well such as the hole in the floorboard of the drivers side from way back when I used to wear high heeled shoes and apparently dug my left heel into the floor. Or the giant stain in the back seat from unknown ice cream spill by a child. Sure, it isn’t pretty, but it is paid for so each time a new knock or rattle or sputter brings me back to the mechanic I continue to answer his same question, “Are we keeping it?” with “Yep, still cheaper to fix than buying a new one.”

 At what point will the answer change? Well, obviously an extremely high cost repair will quantify an evening of math to decide but for the most part there are many of us that drive our cars until the wheels fall off.  

The average American keeps their car for around 6 years and the average age of American’s cars is a little over 11 years old.[1]

The average yearly repair cost on a ten year old vehicle ranges anywhere from around $300 a year to over $1000 a year.[2] With the average car payment around $550 per month this math works out quite well the keep the old dinged and stained car around a little bit longer.[3]  Even new cars often require repairs that go above and beyond the monthly payment.

With all that said, if you’re thinking about keeping your car as long as possible here are a few tips from the experts at Car Talk:

  • If buying a car with the intention to keep it long term, do as much research as you can before deciding on which one to take home.

  • Stay on top of recommended maintenance (especially fluid changes), don’t ignore concerns and never ignore engine warning signs.

  • Avoid keeping heavy items in your vehicle if possible, plan errands ahead of time to avoid short trips to and from home and when you can, simply keep your car at home.

  • -Find a trustworthy mechanic and take the time to communicate how long you hope to keep your car running.

Knowing the possibility that the day may arrive that you and your vehicle are forced to part ways, start saving now. As long as you don’t have a car payment, put a similar amount in savings each month to make that future transition much less financially painful.

In the meantime, be proud you kept that character filled payed off auto on the road. Besides, nothing gets a conversation going like a car scar story!

Blog by: Allison Green

Increased Old Car Thefts in Missouri

Each year a new “most stolen” list of cars preferred by thieves is released and in years back most that made the unfortunate list were very new or close to new models. That list however is changing. Nationally, the most stolen car is the 1998 Honda Civic followed closely by the 1997 Honda Accord. According to Forbes, there’s a simple explanation, these cars are easier to steal because they don’t have smart key technology. Following the Hondas are a list of newer vehicles such as 2006 F-150 at #3 and the 2017 Toyota Camry at #4.

Kansas City police arrest a woman in a stolen Cadillac Escalade. Car thefts in Missouri have skyrocketed following a change in scrap yard laws in 2012. Photo Credit: SAM ZEFF / KCUR 89.3.

Kansas City police arrest a woman in a stolen Cadillac Escalade. Car thefts in Missouri have skyrocketed following a change in scrap yard laws in 2012. Photo Credit: SAM ZEFF / KCUR 89.3.

Here in Missouri however, older cars have seen an unusual increase in being stolen. This oddity is considered to be directly related to a 2012 Missouri Law allowing for anyone to sell a vehicle over ten years old for scrap even without a title. The law was originally passed to help rural farmers and land owners who needed to remove abandoned vehicles without titles from their property. Since this law went into effect auto thefts are up by one third in Kansas City while St. Louis has seen a 37% increase of old cars stolen since 2012. Even the state of Kansas has experienced a 24% increase in car thefts. To curb the increase cities and legislators are looking for ways to ensure the scrapyards that accept vehicles are enforcing the rule that these vehicles are not operable. Some municipalities are also working to create ordinances that require scrapyards to collect identification information from the seller of the vehicle. Many scrapyards have already voluntarily applied these suggestions and work with law enforcement to help curb theft for scrap. Although most vehicles only provide $200 - $500 in scrap value, the amounts are enough to keep the bad apples out looking for the next car to cash in on.

How can you protect your older vehicle from being stolen? Here are a few tips:

  • Be wary of unmarked (no company name or logo) tow vehicles. This is the most common way older vehicles are stolen.

  • Don’t leave a broken-down vehicle in an area that it could be easily towed away and when possible make the necessary repairs to the vehicle quickly to avoid the temptation. Even a flat tire can be regarded as making a car inoperable at a scrapyard that doesn’t thoroughly check what is brought in.

  • Install a GPS system to track your vehicle in the case it is stolen.

  • Don’t leave valuables in plain sight.

Blog by: Allison Green